Tag Archives: london transport

Flat out

One of the problems with being a historian is that every time you see the phrase ‘revolutionary thinking’ there’s a jaded sounding little voice in your head that sarcastically says really? So when the Londonist opened an article with the … Continue reading

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Pipe Down

Last month we dealt with how the Underground became a smoker’s paradise. This month, we look at how it all fell apart. By 1926 around eighty per cent of carriages on the tube were smoking cars, and smokers had free reign … Continue reading

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Our man on the Pirate Bus

Ten years ago a revelation appeared in London. To some it was part of the relentless march of technology. To others it was convenience epitomised. The Oyster card had arrived. Since its introduction it’s undoubtedly made life, on the whole, … Continue reading

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Rush hour, gardening, and women.

In the aftermath of the Great War London’s public transport was in a crisis. Infrastructure had been run down, locomotives and buses had been sent to France, and passenger numbers had soared. In 1918 the Underground Electric Railways Company, which … Continue reading

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